mymodernmet:

South African artist Chris Slabber has created a spectacular new series called Destruction/Creation, which features images of gorgeous “sculptures” formed from paint swirling in water. He uses photo manipulation to form delicate figures in the billows of paint, creating stunning portraits.

highkeygay:

wake up open the curtains

image

take a shower then dry my hair

image

come down stairs ready for breakfast

image

greet the mailman

image

(via onlylolgifs)

An Ode to Cheese

an ode to cheese

by: theunearthedme


oh cheese,
my dear, dear cheese,
salty love of my life,
why do you hate me so?
as i consume you daily,
with hope that you one day return the feelings of affection,
you choose to leave me,
through my stomach,
then my butt,
with as fiery a fury as my fiery passion towards you.
and though i may lack the lactase,
i need to digest your lactose,
your variety of flavors are never lacking.
all i ask is for your consent,
to enter the depths of my body without painful consequence.
my mind is always ready,
to push the boundaries of my love,
but my butt,
well that’s another story.

karethdreams:

The Wage Gap: A Handy Visual Guide

(via upworthy)

adoptpets:

adoptpets:

Who’s a pretty boy? You are, yes you are!

Bee covered in pollen resting in the heart of a crocus flower.

Nature-loving photographer, Boris Godfroid, uses macro photography for close-up shots, posted to his website boris.godfroidbrothers.be



Happy 1st Day of Spring!

Plant some flowers for the bees.

(via iguanamouth)

ticktockdearie:

doctorbee:

xwidep:

Scales

This is because Fahrenheit is based on a brine scale and the human body. The scale is basically how cold does it have to be to freeze saltwater (zero Fahrenheit) to what temperature is the human body (100-ish Fahrenheit, although now we know that’s not exactly accurate). Fahrenheit was designed around humans.Celsius and Kelvin are designed around the natural world.Celsius is a scale based on water. Zero is when water freezes, 100 is when water boils.Kelvin uses the same scale as Celsius (one degree, as a unit, is the same between the two), but defines zero as absolute zero, which is basically the temperature at which atoms literally stop doing that spinning thing. Nothing can exist below zero Kelvin. It’s the bottom of the scale.So.Fahrenheit: what temperatures affect humansCelsius: what temperatures affect waterKelvin: what temperatures affect atoms

I like how this very helpful explanation contained the phrase “stop doing that spinning thing”

ticktockdearie:

doctorbee:

xwidep:

Scales

This is because Fahrenheit is based on a brine scale and the human body. The scale is basically how cold does it have to be to freeze saltwater (zero Fahrenheit) to what temperature is the human body (100-ish Fahrenheit, although now we know that’s not exactly accurate). Fahrenheit was designed around humans.

Celsius and Kelvin are designed around the natural world.

Celsius is a scale based on water. Zero is when water freezes, 100 is when water boils.

Kelvin uses the same scale as Celsius (one degree, as a unit, is the same between the two), but defines zero as absolute zero, which is basically the temperature at which atoms literally stop doing that spinning thing. Nothing can exist below zero Kelvin. It’s the bottom of the scale.

So.
Fahrenheit: what temperatures affect humans
Celsius: what temperatures affect water
Kelvin: what temperatures affect atoms

I like how this very helpful explanation contained the phrase “stop doing that spinning thing”

(via iguanamouth)

waltermittymovie:

We’ve collected 24 inspirational stories from around the globe and now it’s your turn to share how you #LetLifeIn!
Enter the Find Your Frame 25 Sweepstakes for chance to win a trip to Iceland!

waltermittymovie:

We’ve collected 24 inspirational stories from around the globe and now it’s your turn to share how you #LetLifeIn!

Enter the Find Your Frame 25 Sweepstakes for chance to win a trip to Iceland!

exclusivelyselectedlingerie:

pleasurements:

Bordelle Bond-Age Swimsuit

<3

um. yes.

must read.